Ivo Dimchev

Ivo Dimchev
Ivo Dimchev as Lili Handel

Katko

The provocateur, the risk-taker, the healer, the activist, the ultimate performer. And don’t forget to bring cash when you go to see Ivo Dimchev’s latest work ‘METCH’, because he delves deeply into the question of the value of art.

Dance journalist from Sofia, editor of dancemag.eu and dramaturgynew.eu

I still remember vividly that late autumn evening in 2004 when the Sofia premiere of ‘Lili Handel’, Ivo Dimchev’s first solo, took place. It launched the performing arts programme of the newly-opened Red House Centre for Culture and Debate that back then was the main venue for independent arts and culture, but has since closed. At that time, Ivo Dimchev was a familiar name mainly in professional art circles, who eagerly followed the outbreak of new forms and initiatives in theatre and dance after the fall of the totalitarian communist regime and into the early 2000s. He had already garnered attention in several landmark dance and theatre performances of the period with his unusual presence, always tending towards excess.

Masaki Iwana

La Maison du Butoh Blanc

One of these was ‘Sleeping Dog’ (2001) by butoh icon Masaki Iwana, which he created after a workshop at the short-lived Summer Academy for Performing Arts near Sofia in 2000.

Ivo Dimchev in “The Garden of the Singing Ficuses” (left) and “Sleeping Dog”

Archiv Ivo Dimchev

Dimchev offered his own interpretation of butoh in his first original work, the group piece ‘The Garden of the Singing Ficuses’ (2002). But it was only in ‘Lili Handel (Blood, Poetry and Music from the White Whore’s Boudoir)’ that he revealed his full potential.

Certain scenes from the intense 50 minutes of this solo are etched in my mind and I now invariably associate them with Dimchev’s artistic individuality. The opening song ‘Mona Lisa’ accompanies the appearance of the androgynous Diva, who enters, taking small, hesitant steps in high heels, wearing only a pearl-adorned G-string and a fur coat. Their entire body is covered in white powder, their face heavily made up. The Diva sings along with Nat King Cole in an operatic voice that builds to a crescendo, the hands following the movements of the voice as if body and sound merge into one. But the aging Diva looks worn, like they have given themselves away. The performer’s body exudes ambivalent eroticism and intense magnetism, tragically bearing the traces of the transience of time, of human ability, of glory. There is a decadence to the excessiveness and extravagance of Ivo Dimchev’s Lili Handel that is akin to self-parody.

Ivo Dimchev in “Lili Handel”

Katko

The performer sits in a worn red armchair befitting the ‘boudoir of the white whore’ and shakes their torso, from which a cacophony of voices seems to emerge; voices appearing to come from other bodies, roles, minds that inhabit their corpse. Over the course of the performance, Dimchev’s presence shifts from the territory of the rational that is defined as human and unleashes a raw, almost animal energy. At the end he announces an auction for a vial of his blood drawn live on stage and sells it to the highest bidder.

Back then in 2004, before Ivo Dimchev became a sensation, ‘Lili Handel’ was one of the first encounters with live art for us, the handful of spectators at the Red House. The only thing that we understood with certainty was that we were witnessing the rise of an extraordinary performer. In ‘Lili Handel’, Ivo Dimchev built his signature persona, which still reappears in his creations. It is a manifestation of what he calls ‘the performative body’ – it has no fixed gender, no fixed identity; it is fluid, in a continuous process of transformation. His persona brings ‘before the eyes that which has long been living in the back of your head’ as one of the lines in the performance reads.

The piece exposes the performer not only as a sublime and sublimating figure, but also as a perfect seducer, as an object of consumption, as a piece of art. At the same time, it reveals the stage as a place of real expenditure of energy, of amortization, a place of sacrifice.

in “Lili Handel”

Ivo Dimchev

Created exactly 20 years ago, this performance was kind of a capsule of Ivo Dimchev’s artistic practice, containing crucial elements that he elaborated vigorously on in his subsequent creations. ‘The body as a musical instrument, the performative body as a piece of art, the relationship between the sexual and the aesthetic, the genderless body, the relationship between value and art, the artwork as a commodity, the body as a commodity, the partnership with the audience… All these ideas started in ‘Lili Handel’ and developed much further in other works later on’, explained Dimchev in a short written interview that I managed to do with him in between his flights and tours. Today his oeuvre includes more than 40 solo and group stage performances produced all over Europe and in the US, and he has received numerous international awards for dance and theatre. Now he is hard to reach, with a packed schedule booked a year in advance. I caught him shortly before his appearance at Glastonbury, the world’s biggest music festival, where he performed a concert a few days before Marina Abramovic took the stage.

in “Begeraz Top40”

Ivo Dimchev

Indeed, one fundamental characteristic of the performative body in his practice is that it also knows no boundaries in art. Today, Ivo Dimchev’s artistic activity can hardly be pigeonholed into established categories. It is both hyper-theatrical and highly physical, using the body as the main instrument. With his extremely rich means of expression, which equally involve movement, singing, speech and are also gradually incorporating the visual arts, he makes the boundaries between physical theatre, contemporary choreography, performance and installation fluid. For several years he has been enjoying success through musical concerts, making each of these, too, a vivid stage performance. ‘I am interested in the physicality of music and the melody of my muscles’, Dimchev says of the special significance of music in his performances, in which singing becomes a physical effort – an extension, even an excess of physicality.

in “Avoiding deLIFEath”

Ivo Dimchev

His career as a singer-songwriter illustrates the ease with which Ivo Dimchev traverses the most diverse forms of art and his ability to meet the elitist and the popular, the arty and the trashy in unexpected ways. In September 2018, he appeared on British reality television talent show ‘The X Factor’, presenting a choreography and a song that stood out as a work of art and provoked an incredible clash of opinions in judging his performance and interpreting his decision to participate. Behind this decision, of course, was his personal interest in promoting himself on the music market, but he also had another mission – namely, to make contemporary art more popular.

Taking part in this show, stepping outside of his comfort zone as a contemporary live art icon, and confronting the laws of a completely different market, was definitely a conscious risk. Ivo Dimchev took this risk in his own way – conceptually, daringly, unceremoniously, provoking a wave of comments and counter-reactions. These escalated rather unexpectedly into the question: how closed is the contemporary art scene, where are its borders, what are the barriers that stand between it and the general public?

in “Som Faves”

Whatever Dimchev gets up to, it is marked by a defining feature of his ethos as an artist that can broadly be described as ‘provocation’, the meaning of which, however, lies in constantly asking what value there is in art and how this value is determined; in what terms it is defined. He introduced this question in ‘Lili Handel’, but it appears in most of his pieces. One such example is ‘Som Faves’ (2009), which includes a scene in which he kneels as he holds a cheap painting high above him, and shouts ‘Respect art!’ with increasing insistence and building up to a hysterical, almost sarcastic rage before performing a series of elaborate physical actions with the painting (such as placing it on his head while standing in a difficult pose). In these actions, he continually alters the viewers’ relationship to the canvas, making them examine in a paradoxical way the reasons why they are called upon to ‘respect art’. ‘The value of art is a very interesting topic. What has value and what does not have value, what helps us or gives us the right to define these values… So I bought a terribly cheap painting from a market in Amsterdam and tried to manipulate the value that the viewer attaches to it. (…)The value of things and, respectively, their price – not only in art but in life – is a huge topic. There is no way to ignore it’, Dimchev had said in a previous interview I did with him after the presentation of ‘Som Faves’ in Bulgaria years ago.

“P Project” in Berlin

Ivo Dimchev

One of his most extreme experiments with the value/price ratio in art is his first fully interactive performance ‘P Project’ (2012), in which he directly involves the audience as performers. Dimchev organizes this event as a conceptual performance, a social experiment and a reality show at the same time. The bare white stage contains only a keyboard, a chair and a table with a laptop. The performer appears in his well-known persona – this time almost naked, again in high heels, wearing only a red sheer scarf, the pearl-adorned G-string and a black wig, the face hidden behind heavy make-up. Thus, he stages himself as a total artificiality, a ‘body fiction’, and immediately claims the scene as a second-order reality. This is relevant to what is to follow. He invites the audience to voluntarily participate in and add content to the robust dramaturgical structure of the performance. This consists of a series of tasks that willing spectators can perform on stage, and it is the rare instance of participatory performance in which the spectators get paid for their labours.

The carefully-devised tasks set by Dimchev as author, host and master of ceremonies are meant to test the limits of those volunteers who dare to play along. They must write poetry, which Dimchev promptly turns into an improvised song, or perform a dance, which he accompanies on the keyboard.

“Begeraz Top 40”

Ivo Dimchev

A couple (regardless of gender) kiss on stage or simulate sex, other participants have the freedom to perform any way they want. Finally, two volunteers have to write and read a positive and negative review of what just happened. And all the while, Ivo Dimchev does nothing to make the task of his temporary collaborators any easier. He constantly provokes them, alternating between roles as a statue, stage owner and host, dictator-director, encouraging collaborator or artist-creator, who sings the texts of the poets as they appear on the screen in front of him, giving a special emotional intensity and dramatic feeling to each moment.

“The P Project”

Ivo Dimchev

Basically, the ‘project’ behind ‘P Project’ is to set a kind of trap for preconceived expectations and notions of art, to test their limits by placing in controversial relationships the categories through which it is usually evaluated, creating a paradox between mastery/amateurism, role/authenticity, artifice/ineptitude, success/failure, socially acceptable/unacceptable etc., bringing all of them onto the stage. But the goal is not to ‘devalue’ one and validate the other. In this territory of relationalities, the performance also brings onto the stage, quite literally, the monetary cost as capital that is invested in art and usually remains invisible to the spectators beyond the tickets they buy. Here the price serves as a kind of regulator.

“The P Project”

Ivo Dimchev

Ivo Dimchev, as the ‘payer’, determines it based on the degree of risk that the given task poses to the volunteers. The highest ‘fee’ goes to those who dare to do what we shall call intimate scenes – these make the participants the most vulnerable to their own limits as well as the limits of what is generally accepted. But an artist like Ivo Dimchev, acutely aware as he is of how the art market functions, knows very well that the high price can also serve as a motivation for viewers to accept the challenge. For the last task – writing a review – the money somehow (logically?) runs out and the temporary critics must be paid by the audience. A very good move that draws attention to the fact that critiquing art is a public activity and a public responsibility that everyone should bear, also financially.

And speaking of criticism, the format of ‘P Project’ raises the general question that is fundamentally faced by every artwork – namely, the question of its successfulness. Here, however, this issue is also relativized. What would be the criteria by which to measure how successful this show is when it defies the traditional evaluation of, let’s say, the quality of a performance with its various degrees of virtuosity, skill, mastery? Perhaps they should circle around the question of how the concept and structure of the performance worked out or did not work out? In so far as ‘P Project’ is wholly dependent on the audience’s participation and reactions, their willingness or refusal to take part, the concept itself involves a high degree of risk-taking on the part of the author.

And speaking of risk and audiences, I also remember very well the point in ‘Som Faves’ when Ivo Dimchev started singing Kenny Rogers’ ‘The Gambler’. To me, this seemed like a comment on the role of the performer – there are always some real stakes in any performance, and the performer should always sense those in the auditorium and know when to ‘hold them, know when to fold them, know when to walk away, and know when to run.’ When I asked Ivo how justified this view of mine is, this was what he said: ‘The only aspect in regard to which I can relate to a gambler is the risk-taking. I love taking risks and playing with comfort zones – my own and those of my partners on stage, whether they are performers or audience members. Gambling in art is good because it creates ‘errors’ and errors, for me, are gateways to freedom, losing control and allowing the artwork to separate from the artist and have its own life, its own creative process.’ At another point he stated: ‘One of the reasons I’m a good solo performer is that I turn the audience into the perfect partner: A partner in crime. The crime of crossing the line.’

“I Cure”

Ivo Dimchev

Next to the question of value, another issue that is very present in his work is exploring, again in his paradoxical way, the relationships between performer, audience and world. This was largely monetized in ‘P Project’, but went in a totally different direction in his later performance ‘I-Cure’ (2014). As the title suggests, Dimchev defines the piece as ‘a healing performance’, referring to a relatively long tradition and persistent concept in performance art that performance, which blurs the boundaries between art and life, can have a powerful transformative power and heal the world of its traumas by invoking a sense of interconnectedness, unity and wholeness among all that exists.

In his own way, he accommodates ‘I-Cure’ (and, to some extent, also his preoccupations with music) within this tradition. Like ‘P Project’, ‘I-Cure’ is also hailed as an ‘interactive performance’, but it no longer lifts the audience out of their seats, no longer puts them on stage, but merely dissolves the barrier separating stage from spectators by addressing them directly.

Ivo Dimchev

From the outset, the stage situation and action are hailed as a ‘healing session’ led by the performer. He appears in a new incarnation of Ivo Dimchev’s persona, disguised as a diva with a long blonde wig, loud make-up and skimpy clothing, and resembling an eccentric esotericist.

Ivo Dimchev

I cure card

In the manner of a flamboyant moderator, he greets the spectators who have come to the ‘most healing performance of the year’ and coquettishly and insistently introduces his main instrument – the so-called ‘i-cure card,’ an image of which lights up on a large TV screen. Everyone in the audience holds one in their hand along with a pencil distributed prior to the start of the performance. The card contains four circles in which audience members are to write the name of an organ of the body, a situation in life, a person or something else they wish to heal as a means of supporting the performance and directing the ‘frequencies’ and positive energy they receive from it towards them with ‘healing intention’. The centre of the card is occupied by a red dot that symbolizes each card holder. In an unexpected way, the solo facilitates an exchange of energy between performer and audience as the performance unfolds. However, it neither idealizes this exchange nor romanticizes it, nor assumes it a given. The performer takes on the task of organizing this relationship, intensifying, concentrating, channelling and transforming it, and the i-cure card is intended to serve as the tool with which this is achieved. It is intended to enable more direct and personal contact between the spectator and what is happening on stage and to help maintain this contact.

Ivo Dimchev

The i-cure card is a ‘universal spiritual technology’ and the performance enables us to ‘practice extracting positive vibrations’ from the world around us. In a paradoxical, seemingly naïve way, Dimchev confronts the banal (the profane) and representations of archetypal images and contents.

Playing the cello and singing against a backdrop depicting an idyllic beach with a palm tree on a TV screen, he takes on the role of a mermaid-like mythical creature who claims to have been ‘here for centuries, called to spread love’.

Amid an amusing shot of a running cheetah, the performer undergoes another metamorphosis into a sort of universal mother who must feed her children.

Ivo Dimchev

He portrays this mother in the form of a waterfall, which spreads energy, invokes the healing power of sexual energy by simulating sex on stage, speaks in different languages while being given a massage, which is beneficial not only to the giver and the recipient, but also to the onlookers…

Ivo Dimchev

He presents the image of the self-giving artist as both a kind of super-being and a vulnerable person who carries within him his dilemmas and inner contradictions, which can also be transformed into ‘positive vibrations’. We, the viewers, are periodically reminded to press a finger on the different points of the ‘i-cure card’ in our hands and intensify their energy…

‘Do you really believe in the transformative power of performance?’, I asked Dimchev in our recent brief written exchange. ‘Yes, I believe a good performance can inspire and unlock suppressed potential in the viewer on a personal and on a professional level. I have seen it happen many times’, he answered.

Poster

Ivo Dimchev

And he also tries that in his latest stage work ‘METCH’, which premiered last February at La Mama in New York. The title is an acronym for Music, Exhibition, Text and Choreography and Dimchev uses the piece to blend the artistic methods and strategies he has experimented with so far by combining elements of previous creations, and, of course, singing some of his signature songs. ‘There are ideas in my old works that I really need to recycle’, he explains. And ‘METCH’ looks both familiar and fresh. Here he blends all his manifestations – the queer diva, the performer, the singer, the painter.

One trademark of Ivo Dimchev’s works is their constant experimentation with forms of engaging the audience. There are many examples other than those already mentioned above. In ‘Facebook Theatre’ (2016), for example, people could write lyrics to the songs he simultaneously sang on the stage on social media.

in “Facebook Theatre”

Ivo Dimchev

In ‘The Selfie Concert’ (2018), he let the audience walk around and take selfies with him as he played and sang. In ‘METCH’, he keeps the audience under control and gives them the role of the ideal partner, tasking them with reading questions projected on the wall, asking him to explain his artistic decisions and actions and propelling the dramaturgy forward.

in “The Selfie Concert”

Emilia Milewska

The show is organized around an exhibition of Dimchev’s paintings, with spectators invited to vote on which ones should be put up for auction as they listen to some of his better (more lyrical, as he jokes) songs. They are then asked to bid on the songs and can eventually buy some for real. When I asked him ‘What do you do: art or business?’, it seemed to annoy him a little. ‘I do art only. But I love to talk about/comment on or make fun of the business side of it”, he stated.

Ivo Dimchev

“Fest” von Ivo Dimchev

In this regard he mentioned also the group piece ‘Fest’ (2013), a brutal satire of the festival market in the dance world.

‘I find the power dynamics very theatrical’, continues Dimchev. ‘I can’t pass up the chance to explore and amplify these very obvious but sometimes well-hidden dimensions. Also, you don’t know where exactly the art work starts and where it ends… The blurred lines between the artist, the artwork and the art world, the rest of the world, God and the World Bank… They are each part of one another… And it has been always that way. Anyone who declares themselves to be separate is simply delusional.’

in “METCH”

Ivo Dimchev

In ‘METCH’, Dimchev does not fail to expose the performance as a product that needs to be attractively promoted and eventually sold. He summons the performance’s photographer to take special photos for the press while practicing onstage his new ‘trick’ of choreographing – talking and moving while keeping the dynamics of voice, text and choreography separate. On one hand, this is intended to prove that he is a ‘good professional’, and on the other, that form already has content, and content already has form. The question arises as to what makes more sense in today’s world, oriented as it is towards the constant production of images that are valued more than the things they represent (if any): the acts themselves as they occur or the images of them which capture elements of their form? What determines the price of the paintings and does the fact that they are exposed and even painted during a live performance event make them more valuable?

‘Price is the simplest and most common form of value’, says Dimchev in the interview. ‘That’s why it’s easy to play with. But value has many other dimensions, all of which can constantly be manipulated by the artist, the producer and the audience. The question is who has the most control of it. I would like to think the artist has the last word… but you never know!’

In ‘METCH’, he again tackles the question of the value of an artwork – as always not through an anarchistic, destructive gesture, but instead by provoking clashes of ideas and perceptions, by staging paradoxes whose resolution may not be possible, but which elicit a continuous change of perspective. It is this transformative power of performance that is central to his oeuvre, and he pledges himself to it in a physically affective, extraordinary way that covers a wide spectrum of moods – from instances of humour and absurdity to moments of fragility and a deep sense of the nature of his creation and how it relates to everything around it.

Ivo Dimchev

In the beginning, we see Dimchev coming onstage with an easel on his back, evoking the image of Jesus carrying the cross to Golgotha. For the artist, making art is both a burden and a relief, an ultimate urge that needs to be indulged notwithstanding the ‘enormous amount of fragile luggage’ it generates, as Dimchev says later on in his fake interview with the audience. There is a scene close to the finale where he arranges his paintings in several rows on the wall with the help of the audience – bright colours and rough human figures in a variety of sex positions in an almost trashy, neo-expressionist style. Seen side by side, they resemble an open abyss of the dark obsessive power of sex and sexuality while also unveiling a troubling tenderness and desire for extreme closeness and love. They look horrific yet painful, unabashedly carnal, even pornographic, yet simultaneously magnetic thanks to the explosive energy they emanate. In the finale, as he listens to positive and negative comments coming from the audience upon his instruction, showering himself with positive and negative energy, he paints a mother carrying a dead child in her arms.

Ivo Dimchev

The scene is a remake of a moment during the performance of ‘I-Cure’, at the height of the Syrian crisis, when captured moments of death and destruction were constantly circulating. At this particular moment, a real picture of two murdered children with their mother’s corpse next to them was shown on screen, their clothing making it clear that that they were from the Middle East.

In a kind of psychotic trance, Dimchev then delivered a monologue in which different voices featured – those of people looking at the photo (presumably the viewers’ opinions), his own voice (what is his responsibility as an artist in the face of violence in the world?) and the voices of the dead children with whom he ‘talked’. He feverishly embodied all these positions, negotiating the shock elicited by this sight of extreme violence but also seeking an exit that could transform it into another kind of power. In this tense moment, in a strangely comical manner he took his ‘i-cure card’ and urged the viewers to extract ‘kindness’ from the image. The naivety and seeming absurdity of the gesture was quickly overcome by the seriousness of the message, and it invited us to follow Dimchev’s idea and perceive the performance as an attempt to connect with the world and each other in a way that can transform pain and violence into something else – for Ivo Dimchev into love, into empathy, into a strength that enables us to move forward.

in “METCH”

Ivo Dimchev

‘METCH’ continues to propagate this idea in a world that is much more deeply embroiled in violence and tragedy. Projected lines on the wall prompt the audience to demand that the performer on the stage ‘love these dead children as they are’, to accept that the picture represents ‘the very complex nature of life’. With his wig removed, Dimchev paints his upper body, head and face with white paint taking on a shaman-like appearance. The artist places his keyboard on the easel and performs his song ‘I’m travelling light’. Can the artist be ‘a travelling light’ between different worlds, an embodiment of some superpower that is called to transform the sufferings in the world into ‘frequencies’ as Dimchev terms them, that bring reconciliation, love, a positive relationship with the other and with the world? Can a performance have that kind of value?

The most recent stop on the ‘METCH’ European tour is Vienna’s ImPulsTanz festival. The programme reads that ‘few artists are as closely connected with ImPulsTanz as Ivo Dimchev’. And that is very much true. He first appeared there in 2003 as a participant in DanceWeb, and was already featured in the festival’s main programme by 2009 along with ‘Lili Handel’. Since then, ImPulsTanz has presented and even co-produced some of his major pieces and has played an important role in his career.

“METCH”

Ivo Dimchev

I watched ‘METCH’ in Dimchev’s native Sofia at the Bulgarian Dance Platform as part of the 18th Antistatic Festival for Contemporary Dance and Performance. One curious fact is that the festival is organized by Dimchev’s former classmates – dance artists and producers Iva Sveshtarova, Willy Prager and Stephan Shtereff.

Iva Sveshtarova and Willy Prager

Neshka Karadzhinska

In the 1990s, they completed an experimental theatre class in a secondary school in Sofia led by director Nikolai Georgiev, himself a disciple of the neo-avant-garde theatre maker Jerzy Grotowski. Now Iva, Willy and Stephan are strong advocates for contemporary dance in the Bulgarian capital. Over the past decade, the Antistatic Festival, along with the Varna Summer International Theatre Festival and the short-lived DNA-Space for Contemporary Dance and Performance have contributed to the presentation and recognition of Dimchev’s – mainly internationally produced – work in Bulgaria.

Folklore was the only concept of dance for many Bulgarians

‘Bulgaria is the context in which I have grown up as a person and as an artist’, was Dimchev’s reply when I asked how he relates to his native context. ‘It’s a context in which there has been a strong resistance against me since I was a child. And I find this resistance very important and useful because it goes in both directions. Part of my work has appeared as a resistance to this same context. So it’s a love/hate story.’ One of his battlefields is opening public perception to contemporary art. The other is LGBTQ+ rights.

in “Halal”

Ivo Dimchev

Locally Dimchev has become something of a cult figure for the experimental scene and queer community. Here, he owes his fame mainly to his music and activism. Which is not that surprising, ѕіnсе his songs demonstrate to the fullest the versatile, eclectic and provocative nature of his artistic individuality. What’s more, they also manage to reach a broad and very diverse circle of fans.

Relatively regularly Dimchev organizes concerts in Sofia and all over the country. Here, he performs songs that blend high and low genres, drawing on opera, cabaret, lullabies, pop and techno, but also on pop-folk, or chalga, the popular Balkan genre that matches Eastern melodies with disco beats and extols the ordinary pleasures of life – lustful romance, alcohol, money. However, as The New Yorker recently wrote, Dimchev remains ‘profound even when plain’. And he always sticks to his ethos of challenging conventions and creating contradictions.

in “Avoiding deLIFEath”

Ivo Dimchev

During the Covid-19 lockdowns he contested the ban on public gatherings by performing concerts at apartments and houses in Sofia and beyond. A kind of private cultural service that not only placed his art in the everyday environment of people’s homes but was also meant to create some positive and – why not – even healing vibes in rather difficult times.
Now we are expecting the release of a feature-length documentary on these concerts filmed in Sofia, Istanbul, Los Angeles and New York. In addition, Dimchev has announced that one of the stages on which he will appear in 2025 will be the Komische Oper in Berlin where he is supposed to perform in ‘Cabaret’ directed by Kiril Serebrennikov. Furthermore, Vienna can expect him next year at the Wiener Festwochen (Vienna Festival) with the newly-commissioned work ‘The Strauss Technique’ based on the music of Johann Strauss. So it’s safe to say there is more to come from Ivo Dimchev.